"A Global Movement of Positive Energy!"
VERTIKAL LIFE Magazine

 

"I quit my corporate job and became a full-time traveler."

I've seen this quote used all over social media. Travel Bloggers and Instagram Travelers are quick to sell you the dream as you are sitting behind your computer in a dreary office. It sounds perfect, and they make it sound so achievable. "Just buy my 10-week program and I will show you how you, too, can travel full-time."

 Perfect, right? What they do not tell you, however, is that you need to have the mettle to make it work for you. No 10-week program is going to make you an Instagram famous travel blogger overnight. Another massive point that should be noted is the semantics of their wording. "Travel full-time" doesn't mean "full-time vacation"; a common misconception.

Published in Trendsetters

Since coming to China almost two years ago, I have made friends with many of the Chinese people and learned a lot about how their culture is different than mine. I have often been struck by how different the Chinese education system is to my own as well. The children go to school in classes of 40 or more. They each have individual desks and rarely interact with their classmates or teachers. They are taught to focus on their own studies and can easily spend hours a day studying by themselves.


When they get older, there is a strong focus on marriage and finding a husband or wife as quickly as possible, so they can start a family. This is almost considered a measure of their life's success. I decided to ask someone firsthand about their experiences in China to gain a clearer understanding. It's very easy to have misconceptions of a place you've never lived before, so I also asked her perceptions of how Western women's experiences differed in similar situations. Please meet Kitty Wong, a 29-year-old Chinese woman from Southern China.

Published in Living Vertikal

 

 

Inspires Millennials to Follow Their Intuition and Pursue Their Dreams - Without a College Degree

 

The millennial generation's office space looks less like the traditional 9-to-5 cubicle work places and more like flexible schedules from the comfort of their home. Less and less young adults feel the need to go to college, yet the millennial generation is thriving in new job markets, such as YouTube. Why is this so, and how are 18-year olds inspired to follow their dreams and pursue online careers, such as being a YouTuber full time? In an interview with Stella Rae, YouTuber, and social media influencer, we uncovered the drive that enables fresh high school graduates to pursue their entrepreneurial dreams.

Stella Rae is an 18-year-old beauty and lifestyle vlogger, living out her dreams of being a full-time YouTuber in Los Angeles. Sitting down for the interview, she smiles wholeheartedly and seems to radiate the exact same positive energy as in her videos. If you've seen any of her uploads, you know just how authentic she is and how her honesty shines through. She has absolutely nothing to hide, everything to share.

She tells us that she has been making videos since she was ten. "I could share my life and things I was interested in with the rest of the world. I got into makeup and fashion and then I turned vegan so my videos became more centered around that. So, it's really like a reflection of how I've changed and grown up."

Published in Trendsetters

Sustainable, Healthy and Beautiful Planet.

It is no secret that China is one of the biggest contributors to pollution in the world today. When people talk about modern-day China, the images that come to mind are that of smog-laden cities and high levels of the industry. It is such a far cry from the bamboo forests and pagodas associated with it in ancient times.

There is a reason for that; Beijing suffers from an excess of PM2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter). These microparticles can be the cause of illnesses such as asthma, bronchitis and some of China's biggest health threats such as; lung cancer and cardiovascular disease.


Until recently, the statistics surrounding the total amount of people within China that are affected by pollution-caused illnesses was kept strictly censored. However, according to China's ex-Health Minister, Chen Zhu, r of their 1.4 billion strong population, China's air pollution alone kills between 350,000 to 500,000 people per year. This means that there is roughly a 1 in 300 chance that a Chinese citizen will be killed by air pollution.

A US-based nonprofit group called Berkeley Earth released a report indicating that when the pollution levels reach a hazardous status in Beijing, it is as if every man, woman, and child who lives there smoked 1.5 cigarettes per hour regardless of their lifestyle.

Published in Global Sustainability
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